On this day, in Chicano History:

1971: Springfield Missouri:
Reis Lopez Tijerina was freed from federal prison after serving three years for his protests of the Gov’t takeover of Mexican and Spanish Land Grants in New Mexico.

‘He asked me if I was American’: New Orleans man allegedly beaten by NOPD officers tells story

Story via the New Orleans Advocate:
BY RAMON ANTONIO VARGAS | RVARGAS@THEADVOCATE.COM PUBLISHED JUL 24, 2018 AT 5:26 PM | UPDATED JUL 25, 2018 AT 7:26 AM

The New Orleans Police Department arrested two of its own officers and began the process of firing them after an off-duty fight with a civilian early Tuesday near a Mid-City bar, according to authorities.

John Galman and Spencer Sutton — rookies who graduated from the police training academy in December and had not yet completed a required probationary period — were booked on counts of simple battery in connection with an incident that sent the civilian to the hospital.

In a statement, Police Superintendent Michael Harrison said investigators collected video evidence and witness statements which “clearly” established that Galman, 26, and Sutton, 24, were the aggressors in an altercation culminating at Baudin and South Murat streets.

George Gomez, 36, who identified himself as the victim, said he was relieved to learn that Galman and Sutton had been arrested and would be dismissed from the force.

“Members of our department are expected to comply with the law and adhere to the highest standards of professional conduct, whether on- or off-duty,” Harrison’s statement said.

“The swift pace at which the Public Integrity Bureau investigated this incident and the decisive actions taken by the NOPD … by arresting the officers and starting the termination process clearly demonstrate how seriously our department views their actions.”

George Gomez, 36, who identified himself as the victim, said he was relieved to learn that Galman and Sutton had been arrested and would be dismissed from the force.

Gomez still had cuts, bruises, scabs and swelling on his face after being discharged from the hospital later Tuesday, when he shared his recollection of the morning’s events with reporters.

On this day, in Chicano History

Jul. 25, 1846, Matamoros, Mexico:
Ulysses S. Grant, later President of the United States -in a letter to his Lover, Julia Dent writes that U.S. occupation forces have murdered many Mexican civilians and “…seem to enjoy acts of violence…” against Mexicans.

Ulysess S. Grant, love letter from war.

This day, in Chicano History

This day, in Chicano History: July 23
1898: Jerome, Arizona:
The Jerome Mining News re-prints an article complaining that “people of Spanish and Mexican descent are not enlisting” in the war against Spain because of “the tie of language” is stronger than allegiance to the U.S.

This month, in Chicano History – Highlight:

July 24, 1973, 12-year old Santos Rodriguez, from Dallas,TX was shot was shot by police officer Darryl L. Cain in the head while sitting quietly handcuffed in the front seat of the squad car. Santos and his 13-year old brother had been TAKEN from their grandparent’s home by police – who claimed both brothers had burglarized a gas station. The unjustified murder of young Santos was termed “illegal and unjustified” by the Dallas police chief, and sparked massive protests by Dallas Chicanos, and Brown Berets alike. Although officer Cain was later convicted of murder, he received a measly five-year sentence. One year after the killing of young Santos, officer Cain was still free while appealing his sentence. No evidence or witnesses were ever found to place young Santos or his brother at the scene of the gas station burglary.

In this archived 1977 photo, Santos Rodriguez and others slain in police-involved shootings are remembered in a street march in Dallas.